Dinners and the Sunshine Law

Though implementation has been delayed until 2013, per the Sunshine Law, pharmaceutical companies are now collecting information to report to a public website the value of things they give to physicians, including such things as dinner meetings. It may sound like doctors are just being wined and dined to get them to prescribe their medications, but as I’ve said before, there is value in such dinners.

For example, I went to a local dinner meeting early this year, featuring a speaker who was an expert on hypertension. Sure the meal was free, but not such a bargain when you considered that my wife could not attend, it was with people I might not necessarily have chosen to dine with, and despite a long day at the office, this expert was talking about medicine before I could even look at the menu.

But it was worth it because I learned some valuable information. As a result of hearing him talk, one change I made was to more often start giving at least one blood pressure medication at night because he said it would help prevent early morning strokes and heart attacks. After that meeting I later saw an article confirming the value. Had I not attended the talk I might have eventually changed my prescribing habits, but I changed it sooner as a result. In fact studies have shown it usually takes ten years for doctors to incorporate new medical information into their practice.

The pharmaceutical company that sponsored that dinner has a blood pressure medicine that I use some, but frankly not that much, and it has not increased since that dinner meeting. But perhaps I saved a life as a result of knowledge gained from that meeting.

Tort Reform and the Sanctity of the Jury

I serve on WAMPAC, a political action committee for the Washington State Medical Association (WSMA). To help guide our members, last month we met with candidates for Washington State governor Rob McKenna and Jay Inslee.  They were both generous with their time and answered our questions.

As physicians, one of our issues is tort reform. We are concerned that large and unreasonable malpractice awards increase the cost of medical care and cause physicians to order unnecessary tests as ‘defensive medicine’. Attorney General Rob McKenna said he was supportive of tort reform, though didn’t give much specifics. Congressman Jay Inslee said he did not believe in malpractice caps because, he said, unlike others, juries are untainted and therefore we need to respect their decisions. That prompted me to send him the following letter. One month later, he has yet to respond. I wonder how I’ll vote in the primary?

Dear Mr. Inslee,

I enjoyed meeting you, and appreciate your spending time to talk with the Washington State Medical Association WAMPAC Committee 7/3/12 regarding your candidacy for governor.

On the issue of tort reform, you mentioned that you didn’t support malpractice caps because you believed in juries making the decision, as they are untainted by lobbyists or others.

Speaking for myself, I have some concerns about this. Short of Plato’s philosopher kings, juries may be the best choice to decide cases, but they are hardly perfect. There are numerous well documented cases of people sentenced to death, yet later found innocent by DNA evidence. In malpractice cases, I would argue that juries are far from perfect. How else could you explain the differences in the chances of being sued and the size of the award based on specialty (http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMsa1012370)? The average neurosurgeon is sued once every 5 ½ years. You would be hard pressed to find a retired neurosurgeon who has never been sued.

Even if juries make perfectly logical decisions, it’s only as good as the cases presented to them, which may be flawed.

In cases where juries decide the outcome, there are restraints. There are judicial guidelines, and juries cannot impose the death penalty for shoplifting, for example, even if they wanted to. Putting financial caps on malpractice cases would be no different. The jury could still decide if the defendant is guilty, but guidelines would cap the size of the reward.

I hope you will reconsider your view on tort reform.

Sincerely,

Daniel Ginsberg, MD, FACP

Making the Affordable Care Act Individual Mandate Work

The Supreme Court has ruled that most of the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, is constitutional.

In order to provide affordable care to all, insurance companies need the healthy to pay premiums, and not just the people who will use a lot of health care resources. In order to try and ensure this, Congress gave a penalty for those who don’t purchase an insurance plan. The problem is that the penalty is far less than the cost of insurance, and the only way they can even force you to pay is if you are getting a tax refund, in which case they can deduct the fine. So someone could elect to go without insurance, and, whether or not they pay the fine, just sign up if they need it. If enough people did that, the plan would not be sustainable. The penalty is $695, and up to $2085/year or 2.5% of income for a family, though it’s lower the first two years. A healthy individual might decide $695/year for no insurance is a better deal than $2000/year for insurance they don’t think they need.

So I propose a solution. Congress could pass a law saying that if someone does not get and maintain insurance within 1 year of when it becomes mandatory, and if they elect to get it later, they will be responsible for the first $10,000 or so expenses they sustain within the next 3 months of applying for insurance. If they get in a major accident or discover a lump that turns out to be cancer, they will still be able to get care and not be burdened with medical expenses that could easily far exceed $10,000. But for those considering going without insurance, even that would be a tough bill to pay.

Of course even now people go without insurance because they feel they can’t afford it. Although that could still apply after the Affordable Care Act goes into effect, the calculations change. Just as a poker player will adjust their bet depending on the size of the pot, I believe consumers would do the same. Instead of a cost of $2000/year versus $0, it would be $2000 versus $695, for example. Thus the cost of going without insurance in this example would drop from $2000 down to $1305 after paying the penalty (or tax, depending on your point of view). Balancing the benefits of having insurance and the risks of not having it, I think more people would elect to get insured with this plan.

Rush to Judgement

Conservative radio show host Rush Limbaugh recently launched an attack on Georgetown University law student Sandra Fluke. She had testified to house Democrats in support of mandates to provide contraceptive care in insurance plans. On his show two days later, Rush Limbaugh said that Ms. Fluke  was asking for taxpayers to pay her to have sex, and that made her a, “prostitute”.

Others have chimed in that contraception is a lifestyle choice and society shouldn’t have to pay for it.  Whether or not you believe women have the right to get an abortion, it’s a flawed argument. By the same reasoning, insurance shouldn’t cover heart attacks, strokes or cancer if the person smoked or was obese. It’s one thing to incentive healthy behavior, but Rush Limbaugh’s attack is either not well thought out in regards to its health care implications, it’s misogynistic, or it’s politically motivated.

Obamacare and the Supreme Court

This week the Supreme Court agreed to hear a legal challenge to the healthcare reform law, colloquially known as ‘Obamacare”. They have scheduled 5 1/2 hours for oral arguments, dividing the law into four parts, that they will hold over two days. According to a number of articles, this is pretty much unprecedented in modern history. Since 1970 the typical case is allotted one hour for oral arguments, with 30 minutes for each side.

I’m not a lawyer, but I was astounded by these numbers. I realize that the Supreme Court justices spend a lot of time reading written briefs, and probably have internal discussions, but only spending an hour listening to arguments for an issue that has hit the highest court of the nation does not sound like much time to me. If I have a complicated patient in my office, it’s not so unusual that I end up spending an hour on them, and unless they are going on Hospice, they always get a follow-up visit. The Supreme Court gets about 10,000 petitions a year, and only rules on a small fraction of them. Before it gets to that level, many lawyers and judges have already debated the issues, and if the answer was obvious, it would probably have been settled. It seems stingy to me to only giving one hour for oral arguments for cases at that level.

Even 5 1/2 hours doesn’t sound like much. The 12 members of the debt reduction super committee couldn’t come to an agreement on debt reduction after working on the issue for more than 3 months. That’s far more time than the Supreme Court will spend working on the health care law, and I’m not sure that it’s that much less complex than dealing with debt reduction. Of course the justices have the great advantage of not having to worry about getting re-elected.

Right for the Wrong Reason?

In 2007, Texas Governor Rick Perry signed an executive order mandating that teenage girls be vaccinated with Gardasil, a vaccine that helps prevent cervical cancer by providing protection against Human Pappillomavirus, or HPV. This was subsequently overturned by the Texas legislature. Now it’s a matter of discussion among Republican presidential candidates. Representative Michelle Bachmann has criticized not only that, ““To have innocent little 12-year-old girls be forced to have a government injection …is just flat out wrong,” but has also suggested that he was motivated by political donations from pharmaceutical company Merck.

We’ll have to see how things play out in regards to whether Governor Perry made his initial decision because of political donations, but it least has the appearance of impropriety.

From a medical point of view, I think he was right to mandate vaccination against HPV, even if he did so for the wrong reason. According to the CDC and the American Cancer Society, at least half of sexually active people will get infected with HPV in their life. Half of those people are infected between 15 and 24 year of age.

In the United States, about 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer, and 4,000 die from it, each year. HPV causes most of these, as well as many cases of anal and oropharyngeal (mouth and throat) cancer, and genital warts.

As a father of daughters, I get that when they’re 10 to 12-years-old, you don’t want to think of them being sexually active. But most people eventually are, and you can’t be certain that it will only be with one uninfected person the rest of their life. Once they’re infected, it’s too late.

The policy for vaccination against HPV should not be different than for other infectious disease, such as tetanus, polio, measles and chicken pox. If you love your children, you should seriously consider vaccinating them. Even if he had ulterior motives, I think Governor Perry had the right idea.