Glazed Donuts

A couple of pharmaceutical reps brought us lunch to discuss their new product, a testosterone gel that’s more concentrated, and thus lower volume, and applied to the inner thighs. Referring to their main competitor, that uses a larger volume applied to the shoulders and upper arms, one of the reps said that by using his product instead, one could avoid, “that whole glazed doughnut thing.”

Fine Tuning

A typical internal medicine patient has multiple medical problems, such as diabetes, hypertension and high cholesterol. Each visit I try and see if there is something to tweak. Perhaps the blood pressure is a little high or the cholesterol is not at goal. Maybe I can switch a medication to a similar one that recently went generic, or use a combination pill to simplify their regimen. I might correct the vitamin D deficiency I usually find, have them change their aspirin to an enteric coated one to lessen the risk of an ulcer, or try and persuade them to get a vaccination to prevent shingles. Most of us have room to improve when it comes to diet and exercise.

With each visit the patient is a little older, and on average, a little sicker. I hope my fine tuning, and occasional overhaul, will keep them going longer and healthier. In the rare visit where the patient has no complaint and I can’t find something to do, I feel like I’m forgetting something. The visit takes longer than it should as I struggle to come up with something other than telling them keep up the good work. That’s usually appreciated by patients, though.

Over-the-Counter Lipitor?

According to sources in the Wall Street Journal this week, Pfizer said they would apply to sell Lipitor over the counter. This is a bad, bad idea. Lipitor is in the class of medications commonly called statins. Although it’s an excellent drug, it can have serious side effects, including liver and muscle damage. Presumably an OTC dose would be low, and less likely to cause side effects, but it’s still likely patients would inadvertently take it in addition to statins prescribed by their doctor, or along with red yeast rice, a naturally occurring statin.

Even if there was zero risk of side effects, there is a high risk that patients would not use the medication properly. Lipid (cholesterol, triglycerides (fats), HDL (good cholesterol), LDL (bad cholesterol), etc.) management can be quite complex. One should know medical problems that might exacerbate the problem, such as diabetes and thyroid problems. There are many medications to choose besides statins, and different ones work better for some people than others. Then you have to know how aggressively to treat, which depends on the risk of cardiovascular disease, among other things.

Over-the-counter Lipitor would certainly be cheaper than the current prices, but it would likely be more than the generic price. Even if priced below generics, it could cost consumers more because their insurance would likely not cover it if it was available over-the-counter. This is what happened with the antihistamines Allegra and Zyrtec, though generic Claritin (loratadine) is quite cheap now.

So given all the down sides, why would Pfizer try to get OTC Lipitor approved? I wonder if it could have anything to do with their loss of patent protection when it goes generic 11/30/11?! Fortunately it’s unlikely the FDA will fall for this.