Medication Errors

Not infrequently Express Scripts, Medco, or other similar companies send a fax to alert me that my patient is taking two similar medications. Occasionally it’s intentional, but most of the time it means something went wrong.

Sometimes I change a patients’ medication to something similar to achieve better efficacy, to minimize side effects, or due to cost. Although I always put the changes in writing for the patient, telling them what to start and what to stop, this doesn’t always work. Patients may get an automatic refill of the original medication from the pharmacy or call it in when they notice a pill bottle is almost empty. Sometimes they go by a medication list they’ve generated, but not updated, rather than the printout I give them.

Sometimes patients end up on two similar medications after getting one from a specialist who doesn’t realize a patient is taking something, because the patient didn’t bring the list I gave them, and they don’t remember everything they take. For example I might have the patient on lisinopril for hypertension, and their cardiologist prescribes the similar benazepril.

A similar medication error happens when we tell patients to stop a medication and they don’t for similar reasons as above.

So the faxes are helpful when these things are caught, but it would be better if it occurred at the the time the prescription is sent to the pharmacy.  Ideally the pharmacy computer would automatically connect to the physician’s electronic medical record (EMR), particularly the primary care doctor, and compare medication lists. If they had medications to refill that didn’t match the EMR record, they would call to double check if the patient could not give them a good reason for the discrepancy. In addition, the pharmacy computer could keep track of all the chronic medications a patient has filled. If the patient doesn’t get the prescription refilled in a timely manner, their computer would query the physician computer to make sure it was still an active medication. If so they would call the patient (and maybe in the future talk to the patient’s medication list carried on their computer/mobile device) and remind them to refill their medication, assuming someone hadn’t stopped it, the patient was taking samples, or some other good reason.

If you use a program such as Quicken, you can download credit card and other transactions and reconcile them with entries you’ve entered. Comparing medications would be a similar process.

There are certainly barriers to such a solution. Electronic health records would need to have medication fields standardized, and there would need to be protocols to exchange the information. I’m not sure, but I think some of this already exists. Of course there are legal issues such as HIPAA.

As John Lennon said, “You may say I’m a dreamer, but I’m not the only one. I hope someday you’ll join us, and the world will be as one.”

Right for the Wrong Reason?

In 2007, Texas Governor Rick Perry signed an executive order mandating that teenage girls be vaccinated with Gardasil, a vaccine that helps prevent cervical cancer by providing protection against Human Pappillomavirus, or HPV. This was subsequently overturned by the Texas legislature. Now it’s a matter of discussion among Republican presidential candidates. Representative Michelle Bachmann has criticized not only that, ““To have innocent little 12-year-old girls be forced to have a government injection …is just flat out wrong,” but has also suggested that he was motivated by political donations from pharmaceutical company Merck.

We’ll have to see how things play out in regards to whether Governor Perry made his initial decision because of political donations, but it least has the appearance of impropriety.

From a medical point of view, I think he was right to mandate vaccination against HPV, even if he did so for the wrong reason. According to the CDC and the American Cancer Society, at least half of sexually active people will get infected with HPV in their life. Half of those people are infected between 15 and 24 year of age.

In the United States, about 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer, and 4,000 die from it, each year. HPV causes most of these, as well as many cases of anal and oropharyngeal (mouth and throat) cancer, and genital warts.

As a father of daughters, I get that when they’re 10 to 12-years-old, you don’t want to think of them being sexually active. But most people eventually are, and you can’t be certain that it will only be with one uninfected person the rest of their life. Once they’re infected, it’s too late.

The policy for vaccination against HPV should not be different than for other infectious disease, such as tetanus, polio, measles and chicken pox. If you love your children, you should seriously consider vaccinating them. Even if he had ulterior motives, I think Governor Perry had the right idea.

Changing of the Guard

At the start of the 2011 Washington State Medical Association (WSMA) Annual Session in 2011, a list of member physicians who had died in the past year was read. Almost all of them were men. This was a poignant reminder of how much things have changed. Nowadays almost half of all medical school graduates are women.

Migraine or Sinus Disease?

A fractal suggestive of visual changes associated with migraines.

One of the more common reasons patients come to see me is because they think they have a sinus infection. Often they say they have pain in the sinus below their eye, nasal congestion, and may have drainage. They  tell me that they’ve had it before, and antibiotics help.

Careful questioning often reveals that they are really have a migraine headache. Typically they start as a teenager or young adult, and tend to decrease in frequency and severity in the 40’s to 50’s. They may occur on one or both sides of the head, and are often associated with nausea, sensitivity to light and sound, and sometimes people get blurred vision or see white spots or zigzag lines. Going to sleep helps. Migraines are more frequent in females and tend to run in families. If patients are unaware of a family history of headaches, I tell them to ask their mother, sister or daughter because they may just not have mentioned it.

Patients think antibiotics help because their headaches get better a few days after they start the medicine. But migraines generally only last 4 hours to 3 days if you don’t take anything. So the antibiotics get the credit, when none is due.

Sometimes the pain from a migraine goes into the neck, or it’s only felt there, and patients think they have a neck problem. They may go to a chiropractor or massage therapist before they see me.

Migraines are also confused for sinusitis because nerves from the brain that are activated with migraines can stimulate the nose to cause congestion. ‘Sinus Headaches’ was invented by Madison Avenue (or at least some advertising agency) to sell pills. Outside the United States, you won’t find such pills being advertized or sold. Some people truly have headaches from sinus infections, but many headaches thought to be sinusitis, are really migraines.

There are lots of ways to treat migraines, which I won’t discuss in this article, but first you have to get the diagnosis right.

If you have headaches or neck pain, be careful about telling your doctor that you think you have a sinus infection or neck arthritis. You may just convince them you’re right, when maybe you’re having a migraine.